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Q
Max B
Do you have any tips for writing an outline?
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A
Answered by: Self-Employed
 
The majority of professors in law school do NOT require you to cite cases from rote memory on an exam (unless it is open book). The cases should be detailed enough that you know what (1) the rule is, (2) how to apply it according to that set of facts and (3) any exceptions or circumstances in which the rule does not apply. However, outlining is just to give you an overview of the course and familiarize you with the information.

When studying, look at past exams from your professors (should be posted on your school's website) and practice answering them. Each exam's fact pattern MAY resemble a case you have read but often include facts that you have never encountered and you have to use your practical knowledge of what you studied and read, to apply it to the new scenario. Your outline should only be a guide - your practice and application are the most important part of an exam. Clear, concise, straight to the point answers that are logical in structure and content.
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Answered by: Lawyer Up
 
There are TONS of things we can tell you about creating a Civ Pro outline... but the most valuable tip is this:

For each major subject (personal jd, subject-matter jd, Erie etc), make "case charts". This means to make a two-sided chart. Above the chart, write a question that ties all the cases together. For ex: Personal Jurisdiction:Did the Plaintiff choose the correct state to sue this Defendant in?

One side of the chart is for "yes" cases and the other side is for "no" cases. Put each case on the correct side, and then write the case name, a few facts (to remind you what happened) and the reasons for why the forum state chosen was correct or was incorrect. Doing this will help you group cases together based on outcome. If you then have a closed-book exam, you can create a mnemonic device for each side of the chart. That way, you'll be able to write about all the cases that HAD minimum contacts and all the cases that did NOT have minimum contacts.

For more info, help making these charts and outlines, for outline review, phone and video help, a Civ Pro workbook, or outline templates, give us a ring!
www.LetsLawyerUp.com (we have a new name now!).
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